Online Learning Module

This quiz provides questions and answers that help to test your understanding of the Policy. It's split into easier, less easy, and harder questions. These questions will be added to over time, as we collectively grow our experience of using and understanding the Policy:

Quiz

Question 1

Who is the Policy for?

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A.Government agencies

B.Any kind of NGO or charity in New Zealand

C.The whole social sector including government agencies, Non-Government Organisations (NGOs)  and other service providers

D.Any business or organisation that collects information about people

The correct answer is C

“The whole social sector including government agencies, Non-Government Organisations (NGOs)  and other service providers.”

People has asked whether the Policy could, or should, apply more broadly than the social sector given that its core ideas are respect, transparency, and trust.

Whilst the Policy was developed for the social sector, the answer is ‘yes’, much of what it contains is generally useful as good practice advice.

Question 2

What are the Data Protection & Use Principles?

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A.He tāngata, Manaakitanga, Mana whakahaere, Kaitiakitanga and Mahitahitanga

B.Partnership, Participation and Protection

C.Purpose Matters, Transparency & Choice, Access to Information and Sharing Value

D.Rangatiratanga (Authority), Whakapapa (Relationships), Whanaungatanga (Obligations), Kotahitanga (Collective Benefit), Manaakitanga (Reciprocity) and Kaitiakitanga (Guardianship)

The correct answer is A

The summary of each principle is shown below.

The full versions can be found https://dpup.swa.govt.nz/principles/overview-of-principles/.

He tāngata  Focus on improving people’s lives – individuals, children and young   people, whānau, iwi and communities

Manaakitanga  Respect and uphold the mana and dignity of the people, whānau,   communities or groups who share their data and information

Mana whakahaere  Empower people by giving them choice and enabling their access to,   and use of, their data and information

Kaitiakitanga  Act as a steward (a Kaitiaki) in a way that is understood and trusted by   New Zealanders

Mahitahitanga  Work as equals to create and share valuable knowledge 

Question 3

Which statement best summarises the “Purpose Matters” Guideline?

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A. Being clear about why you need data means it’s easier to collect what you need right now, as well as things that you might need at some point in the future.

B. Be clear about purpose from the start to make sure data or information collection or use is based on a clear understanding of why it is needed, and ensures that people’s information is used in a  way that improves wellbeing and builds trust.

The correct answer is B

“Be clear about purpose from the start to make sure data or information collection or use is based on a clear understanding of why it is needed, and to ensure that people’s information is used in a  way that improves wellbeing and builds trust.”

The Purpose Matters guideline encourages broader thinking, focused on the social sector and the relationships between New Zealander’s who access social services, the providers, and funders (usually government).

Being clear about purpose and involving others in its development is a foundation to having the most relevant, useful data or information and collecting and using it in a respectful, trusted and transparent way.

Question 4

Which statement best summarises the “Transparency & Choice” Guideline?

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A. Aim for a “no surprises” approach – service users shouldn’t be surprised about what information is held about them or how it’s used.

Look for ways to provide as many choices as possible – around what information people need to provide, how it’s recorded, who sees it, how it’s shared or used.

B. As long as there is no way to identify someone when their information or data is used, then they don’t need to know what it’s been used for.

If people want to engage with social services then they aren’t able to have any choices about how or why their data or information is collected or used, or who gets to have it or see it. 

The correct answer is A

“Aim for a ‘no surprises’ approach – service users shouldn’t be surprised about what information is held about them or how it’s used.

Look for ways to provide as many choices as possible – around what information people need to provide, how it’s recorded, who sees it, how it’s shared or used.”

Question 5

Which statement best summarises the “Access to Information” Guideline?

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A. Under the Privacy Act people have the right to access, and ask for corrections to, their personal information.

The Access to Information guideline is about Mana Whakahaere and being proactive around these rights. Explain these rights in a way people will understand, make it safe and easy to use them, or look for ways to offer access without service users even having to ask.

B. Under the Privacy Act people have the right to access, and ask for corrections of their personal information.

Access to information is about having processes in place to respond to peoples written requests to access their information.

The correct answer is A

“Under the Privacy Act people have the right to access, and ask for corrections of their personal information.

The Access to Information guideline is about Mana Whakahaere and being proactive around these rights. Explain these rights in a way people will understand, make it safe and easy to use them, or look for ways to offer access without service users even having to ask.”

IMPORTANT TO KNOW: There is no legal requirement for people to put a request in writing for their information.

Question 6

Which statement best summarises the “Sharing Value” Guideline?

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A. All data and information across the social sector should be open and accessible by anyone who wants it. 

Sharing Value means that at the end of any work with data and information we let people know what we learned.

B. To make the most of the opportunities that comes from data and information. Share the results, insights, analysis or protected data with those who have a legitimate interest or use for it.

Sharing Value is also about collaborating and having strong partnerships when it comes to making decisions about the collection or use of people’s data or information.

Involve others with an interest in your work, including service users if possible, from the beginning.

The correct answer is B

To make the most of the opportunities that comes from data and information. Share the results, insights, analysis or protected data with those who have a legitimate interest or use for it.

Sharing Value is also about collaborating and having strong partnerships when it comes to making decisions about the collection or use of people’s data or information.

Involve others with an interest in your work, including service users if possible, from the beginning.

Question 7

Which of the 5 Principles stresses the duty of Transparency?

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A. He tāngata Focus on improving people’s lives – individuals, children and young people, whānau, iwi and communities

B. Manaakitanga Respect and uphold the mana and dignity of the people, whānau, communities or groups who share their data and information

C. Mana whakahaere Empower people by giving them choice and enabling their access to, and use of, their data and information

D. Kaitiakitanga Act as a steward (a Kaitiaki) in a way that is understood and trusted by New Zealanders

E. Mahitahitanga Work as equals to create and share valuable knowledge

The correct answer is D: Kaitiakitanga

The Kaitiakitanga principle includes the advice:

Be open and transparent; support people’s interest or need to understand

  • Building trust, being inclusive, respecting a wide range of views, and working in partnership all rely on open conversations about the collection, use and sharing of data and information and the reasons for doing these things.
  • It’s important to explain things in an accessible and easy to understand way, and in a manner that matches people’s needs and interests. Different types, formats and levels of detail about data and information use will match different interests, levels of comprehension, context and needs of different groups.

Note that the advice focuses on ‘understanding’, rather than simply providing information, and stresses the importance of open conversations about collection and use of people’s information as an important mechanism for building effective and trusted partnerships.

Question 8

Why is the ‘Purpose Matters’ the first of the 4 guidelines?

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A. Being clear about ‘purpose’ is the most important part of ensuring that the way we collect and use people’s information is trusted, and transparent.

B. If we’re unclear about Purpose, then we can’t be sure that a number of legal and ethical considerations have been correctly applied – for example if we don’t know why we originally collected information, then we don’t know if, and for what, we could re-use it later on.

C. Because the He Tāngata principle comes first, which stresses the importance of ensuring that any collection or use of people’s information is for their wellbeing, then it makes sense that Purpose is also the first guideline, so that we can be confident we’ve aligned with this principle from the start.

D. If we’re unclear about Purpose, then it’s impossible to know whether the ‘minimum information needed’ test (part of the He Tāngata principle) is true.

E. All of the above.

The correct answer is E: All of the Above.

The Purpose Matters guideline appears first because the Policy is easier to understand in a complete sense, once you have a strong understanding of the role that Purpose plays in many topics that relate to a trusted approach to people’s information.

Being careful to understand, and be confident in explaining, the purpose(s) behind any collection or use of people’s information, provides a strong foundation for many other detailed activities: writing privacy statements, carrying out privacy impact assessments, and ensuring that service users experience open, transparent, and trusted communication with them about what’s happening with their data and information, and why.